Epitaxial Graphene-Based Biosensor Provides Rapid Detection of COVID-19

Epitaxial Graphene-Based Biosensor Provides Rapid Detection of COVID-19

Epitaxial Graphene-Based Biosensor Provides Rapid Detection of COVID-19

COVID-19 spike protein antibodies are immobilized on quasi-freestanding bilayer epitaxial graphene synthesized on silicon carbide. Graphene's electrical conductivity changes in response to interactions with as little as one attogram of COVID-19 spike protein in mere seconds, allowing for ultra-sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of COVID-19.
COVID-19 spike protein antibodies are immobilized on quasi-freestanding bilayer epitaxial graphene synthesized on silicon carbide. Graphene's electrical conductivity changes in response to interactions with as little as one attogram of COVID-19 spike protein in mere seconds, allowing for ultra-sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of COVID-19.

Assistant Professor Kevin Daniels (ECE/IREAP) and his colleagues, have developed an epitaxial graphene based biosensor that provides rapid detection of COVID-19. 

The biosensor, created by Daniels, Dr. Soaram Kim of the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP)Dr. Heeju Ryu of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Dr. Seo Hyun Kim of the University of Georgia, and Dr. Rachael Myers-Ward of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, tested COVID spike protein ranging from one attogram to one microgram, and can detect COVID spike protein in a few seconds, reuse sensors by simply rinsing in sodium chloride (NaCl), and attain results without sending it off to a lab, unlike the current real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test. Although It is the fastest, most reliable and universally used method for diagnosis, RT-PCR requires a ribonucleic acid (RNA) preparation step, causing a decrease in accuracy as well as sensitivity. In addition, it takes over three hours to complete the current diagnosis for COVID-19. 

The researchers use epitaxial graphene, a single to a few layers of carbon atoms with incredibly high surface area, high electronic conductivity and carrier mobility resulting in ultimate sensitivity for biological sensors. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein antibody & antigen allows high selectivity and an experimental environment that is not dangerous. Therefore the antibody/graphene heterostructure can synergistically improve sensitivity and provide ultra-fast detection.

“These graphene-based sensors are not only much faster than PCR and Rapid test for detecting COVID, but are orders of magnitude more sensitive with the possibility of detecting the virus sooner post-exposure," says Daniels. "The ability to rapidly detect the virus in individuals, even those who were exposed too recently to be detected by other means, is the goal.”

Related Articles:
UMD to Lead $1M NSF Project to Develop a Quantum Network to Interconnect Quantum Computers
Professor Ott Elected as Foreign Member of the Academia Europaea
ECE Alumnus Hobie Cohen makes 3D-printed face shields for hospitals
GAMMA Research Group is Developing Novel COVID-19 Prevention Robots
Nicole Mogul Receives A. James Clark School Outstanding Faculty Service Award
Strong Fall Enrollment in UMD’s Machine Learning and Data Science Programs for Working Professionals
Jacob, Qu Named IEEE Fellows
ECE Alumnus & Advisory Board Member Lyndon Brown Appointed Chief Strategy Officer at Pondurance
Liu Wins 2021 IEEE Fourier Award for Signal Processing
Professor K.J. Ray Liu Elected to Lead IEEE

August 26, 2020


Prev   Next

Current Headlines

Students Assist Sierra Leone School Renovation Project…Virtually!

Equipping Drones to Recover When Things Go Wrong

Waging War on Metastatic Cancer

Search Initiated for New Clark School Dean

Project Management Center for Excellence Lauded by Accreditor

Clark School Grad Takes Top Spots in ASME NSF Research Poster Competition

14 Mtech-affiliated companies named to Maryland’s list of 20 hottest innovative start-ups

Huang, Stroka Labs Collaborate to Advance Understanding of Blood-Brain Barrier

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar