Simon Receives $1.2M NIH Grant

Simon Receives $1.2M NIH Grant

Simon Receives $1.2M NIH Grant

Prof. Jonathan Z. Simon
Prof. Jonathan Z. Simon

Prof. Jonathan Z. Simon (ECE/ISR/Biology) has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for his research, titled "The Neural Basis of Perceptually-Relevant Auditory Modulations in Humans." The five-year grant is worth approximately $1.2 million.

A significant challenge in auditory neuroscience is to understand how speech and other natural sounds are analyzed and encoded in the auditory cortex of the human brain. A major finding is that perception and speech processing are crucially affected by temporal modulations in the acoustic signal. However, identifying the physiological mechanisms that underlie perceptually-relevant temporal modulations presents a considerable technical challenge.

The goal of Simon's research program is to understand how acoustic modulations, the building blocks of speech and other natural sounds are encoded in the auditory cortex.

Prof. Simon's research employs magnetoencephalography (MEG), a non-invasive tool suitable for use in humans that records high-speed neural signals from the entire brain. Simon will use MEG and extracellular recording in complementary ways, to investigate how temporal modulations are encoded by the auditory cortex in the brain.

For more information about the research, visit Prof. Simon's web page.

February 28, 2008


Prev   Next

Current Headlines

2020 Dean's Doctoral Student Research Awards

Mohammad Hafezi Wins 2020 Simons Foundation Investigator Award

Legacy through Impact: Dr. Darryll J. Pines

UMD Team Takes a Top Spot in NASA RASC-AL Design Competition

Rapidly evolving ‘smart marble’ sensors hold promise for monitoring pharmaceutical industry bioreactors and beyond

Assistant Professor Cheng Gong Wins IUPAP Young Scientist Award

Maryland-led, Multi-institutional Research Team Receives $10M to Transform Shellfish Farming with Smart Technology

GAMMA Research Group is Developing Novel COVID-19 Prevention Robots

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar